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ESPN’s Total QBR Added to Player Pages and Leaderboards

Posted by Neil on October 12, 2012

Just wanted to let everyone know that we have now added ESPN's Total Quarterback Rating (QBR) to our player pages and leaderboards.

In case you forgot what QBR is all about, here's a link describing the methodology behind the rating (they also noted several subsequent tweaks here). The scale is 0-100, with average being 50; the best performers tend to be around 75-80 for a full season (Aaron Rodgers set the record with 86.2 last year), while something like the 11.7 that JaMarcus Russell put up in 2009 would be considered the bottom of the barrel.

This entry was posted on Friday, October 12th, 2012 at 10:50 am and is filed under Advanced Stats, Announcement, Pro-Football-Reference.com. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

7 Responses to “ESPN’s Total QBR Added to Player Pages and Leaderboards”

  1. Even though I'm not a huge fan of the Total QBR metric, it's awesome that you have included it. Will it eventually be one of the fields available for sorting in the play index/search tools?

  2. I think this stat is pretty terrible and am kind of upset that football reference uses it as this is a legitimate site that seems to be including this stat simply because it's favored by ESPN. This is a good, informative, unbiased website, don't use this ridiculous statistic simply because ESPN wants to push it down our throats. If you want to use advanced quarterback rating statistics use one of the many at advanced nfl stats, or football outsiders, or anything that has a little more credibility than QBR.

  3. Andrew Luck is a good player.

    Andrew Luck's season can not be objectively measured to be having one of the 10 best seasons of the last 5 years. It's just not possible. QBR leads you to believe otherwise because it justifies his interceptions and low completion percentage. But somehow, Andrew Luck, Matt Ryan, and Alex Smith have a better QBR through 5 games of 2012 then Tom Brady has ever had.

    Vince Young's 2009 season is better than every Aaron Rodgers season except 2011. Jay Cutlers 2008 season is better than every Tony Romo season.

    Charlie Batch has the best single game of all time, going 12/17 with 3 tds and 2 picks.

    Nothing about this stat passes the smell test.

  4. When ESPN first came out with Total QBR I thought it was a good stat. But then someone showed me the Charlie Batch game and that's when I started questioning it's creditably.

    I know question it even more after Sunday. In week 4 against the Panthers Matt Ryan had a line of 25/40 (62.5%), 369 YDS (9.2), 3 TD, 1 INT, 107.2 QB Rating. But his Total QBR was only 47.9 which is below average.

    But then on Sunday against the Raiders Ryan posted a line of 24/37 (64.9%), 249 YDS (6.7), 1 TD, 3 INT, 59.4 QB Rating. But his Total QBR was 53.1 which is above average.

    That's just one of the many examples of how flawed Total QBR is.

  5. OT, but when will the weather data and spread data you guys have going to be incorporated in the site?

  6. Subtraction by addition, I'm afraid. I hate to see proprietary advanced stats getting mainstreamed like this.

  7. J.I. Panick Says:

    Ugh, why?

    No stats are better than bad stats.

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