Sports Reference Blog

Adjusted Shooting Stats Added to Basketball Reference

Posted by Mike Lynch on June 1, 2020

There's been much debate about the greatest players in NBA history of late. One of the most difficult things about ranking players in a league with 70+ years of history is that the game has changed a lot over the years. Sure, some of it has to do with the skill and quality of the players. But some of it also has to do with the quality of the balls, the floors, the rims, the training, the travel, the accommodations, available nutrition and pretty much any other variable you can think of. For a better idea of how the league has changed over time, please see this table of league averages for each season in the history of the NBA. As you can see, 2019-20 is the fifth straight season in which a new league-wide eFG% record has been set. There are clearly things at play here beyond just player improvement. Though today's players are certainly more skilled than the ones that produced a league-wide 27.9 FG% in 1946-47 (the first year of the NBA's 'official' forerunner the, BAA, which was objectively worse than the league it eventually merged with, the NBL).

To help bring a bit of objectivity to cross-era comparisons, we have added an Adjusted Shooting table to all player, team and season pages. These tables will show a player's shooting percentages and tendencies, as well as league-wide percentages and tendencies and then scale them. Like OPS+ on our baseball site it will be scaled so that 100 represents a league-average shooter. 125 is 25% better than average and 75 is 25% worse than average. These figures are obtained by taking the player's shooting percentage, dividing it by the league-wide shooting percentages and then multiplying it by 100. So 125 doesn't mean a player was 25 percentage points above average, but 25 percent above average. We are also publishing adjusted versions of 3-point Attempt Rate and Free Throw Rate to give a better idea of how often the player shot 3s or got to the line relative to their era.

Additionally, we have calculated Field Goal Points Added and True Shooting Points Added to show how many points each player scored above or below what a league average player would have scored given an equal number of field goal attempts or true shot attempts, respectively. This is to show which players combined volume and efficiency (or those that combined volume with inefficiency, for that matter).

While we are not yet publishing leaderboards for these statistics, we have added them to the Player Comparison Finder, where you can compare up to six players at a time. Here's a fun comparison to get you started. If you click the red show/hide search form link you can edit the players or years in your comparison

And since I'm sure you're curious, here are some of the notable best/worst performances in these new statistics:

FG+: No surprise that this category is dominated by bigs who attempted a large share of their shots at the rim. As you can see, Mitchell Robinson is/was on pace to set the all-time single-season record in this category. Of course, it'd a tad easier to separate yourself these days with the league-wide FG% deflated by 3-pt attempts.

Top 10 Seasons (among qualifiers)

  1. 2019-20 Mitchell Robinson: 161
  2. 1972-73 Wilt Chamberlain: 159
  3. 2014-15 DeAndre Jordan: 158
  4. 2016-17 DeAndre Jordan: 156
  5. 1966-67 Wilt Chamberlain: 155
  6. 2015-16 DeAndre Jordan: 155
  7. 2019-20 Rudy Gobert: 152
  8. 2011-12 Tyson Chandler: 152
  9. 2013-14 DeAndre Jordan: 149
  10. 2018-19 Rudy Gobert: 145

Bottom 10 Seasons (among qualifiers)

  1. 1995-96 Bobby Hurley: 61
  2. 1968-69 Richard Clark: 66 (ABA)
  3. 1970-71 Lonnie Wright: 66 (ABA)
  4. 2002-03 Nikoloz Tskitishvili: 66
  5. 2015-16 Rashad Vaughn: 67
  6. 2014-15 Gary Harris: 68
  7. 1963-64 Gene Shue: 68
  8. 1946-47 Bob Fitzgerald: 69
  9. 2000-01 Erick Strickland: 69
  10. 1946-47 Moe Becker: 70

Top 10 Careers (among qualifiers)

  1. DeAndre Jordan: 147
  2. Rudy Gobert: 140
  3. Tyson Chandler: 132
  4. Steven Adams: 129
  5. Dwight Howard: 129
  6. Shaquille O'Neal: 128
  7. Hassan Whiteside: 127
  8. JaVale McGee: 126
  9. Bo Outlaw: 126
  10. Amir Johnson: 125

Bottom 10 Careers (among qualifiers)

  1. Daequan Cook: 81
  2. Marcus Smart: 82
  3. Wendell Ladner: 84
  4. Mike Bratz: 84
  5. George Wilson: 84
  6. Darrick Martin: 84
  7. Woody Sauldsberry: 85
  8. Vernon Maxwell: 85
  9. Brandon Jennings: 85
  10. Rafer Alston: 85

2FG+: If you just compare 2-point field goals, you get an interesting mix of eras. Wilt has many of the best individual seasons, but DeAndre Jordan is easily the career leader (albeit on far less volume).

Top 10 Seasons (among qualifiers)

  1. 1972-73 Wilt Chamberlain: 159
  2. 1966-67 Wilt Chamberlain: 155
  3. 2014-15 DeAndre Jordan: 147
  4. 1946-47 Bob Feerick: 144
  5. 2015-16 DeAndre Jordan: 143
  6. 2011-12 Tyson Chandler: 143
  7. 1971-72 Wilt Chamberlain: 143
  8. 2019-20 Mitchell Robinson: 142
  9. 2016-17 DeAndre Jordan: 142
  10. 1949-50 Alex Groza: 141

Bottom 10 Seasons (among qualifiers)

  1. 1951-52 Jack Kiley: 62
  2. 2000-01 Erick Strickland: 64
  3. 1968-69 Richard Clark: 66 (ABA)
  4. 1970-71 Lonnie Wright: 66 (ABA)
  5. 1989-90 Sidney Lowe: 66
  6. 1980-81 Reggie Carter: 68
  7. 1963-64 Gene Shue: 68
  8. 1975-76 Stew Johnson: 69 (ABA)
  9. 1946-47 Bob Fitzgerald: 69
  10. 2014-15 Ryan Kelly: 69

Top 10 Careers (among qualifiers)

  1. DeAndre Jordan: 135
  2. Rudy Gobert: 126
  3. Wilt Chamberlain: 125
  4. Tyson Chandler: 124
  5. Shaquille O'Neal: 123
  6. Bo Outlaw: 122
  7. Dwight Howard: 121
  8. Artis Gilmore: 121 (including ABA seasons)
  9. Amir Johnson: 120
  10. Mark West: 119

Bottom 10 Careers (among qualifiers)

  1. Anthony Avent: 83
  2. Ricky Rubio: 83
  3. George Wilson: 84
  4. Darrick Martin: 85
  5. Woody Sauldsberry: 85
  6. Brandon Jennings: 85
  7. Rafer Alston: 85
  8. Hot Rod Hundley: 85
  9. John Mahnken: 85
  10. Armond Hill: 85

3FG+: It should come as no surprise that the most outstanding 3-point seasons relative to league average all came in the 80s when the shot was not yet widely adopted (or perfected). It was easy to separate yourself from the pack back then. Note that Larry Bird is the 5th-most accurate 3-point shooter of all time by this measure. As a lifelong 76ers fan I can confirm that Eric Snow was the indeed the worst.

Top 10 Seasons (among qualifiers)

  1. 1981-82 Andrew Toney: 162
  2. 1986-87 Kiki Vandeweghe: 160
  3. 1985-86 Craig Hodges: 160
  4. 1979-80 Fred Brown: 158
  5. 1980-81 Brian Taylor: 156
  6. 1987-88 Craig Hodges: 155
  7. 1987-88 Mark Price: 155
  8. 1984-85 Byron Scott: 153
  9. 1989-90 Steve Kerr: 153
  10. 1979-80 Chris Ford: 152

Bottom 10 Seasons (among qualifiers)

  1. 1987-88 Sleepy Floyd: 16
  2. 2010-11 DeMar DeRozan: 27
  3. 2004-05 Speedy Claxton: 31
  4. 1986-87 Dennis Johnson: 37
  5. 2012-13 Will Barton: 39
  6. 2014-15 Michael Carter-Williams: 41
  7. 1987-88 Michael Jordan: 42
  8. 1988-89 Dennis Johnson: 43
  9. 1991-92 Greg Anthony: 44
  10. 1999-00 Rasheed Wallace: 45

Top 10 Careers (among qualifiers)

  1. Drazen Petrovic: 132
  2. Craig Hodges: 131
  3. Trent Tucker: 131
  4. Steve Kerr: 130
  5. Larry Bird: 127
  6. Hubert Davis: 125
  7. Glen Combs: 125 (ABA)
  8. Seth Curry: 124
  9. George Lehmann: 124 (ABA)
  10. Duncan Robinson: 122

Bottom 10 Careers (among qualifiers)

  1. Eric Snow: 59
  2. Jerome Kersey: 59
  3. Andre Miller: 61
  4. Sam Mitchell: 64
  5. Tony Wroten: 65
  6. Marquis Daniels: 65
  7. Kenyon Martin: 66
  8. Vlade Divac: 68
  9. Anthony Carter: 69
  10. John Williams: 69

eFG+: Even when you switch to eFG% to account for the added value of 3s, you still end up with a list mostly dominated by big men.

Top 10 Seasons (among qualifiers)

  1. 1972-73 Wilt Chamberlain: 159
  2. 1966-67 Wilt Chamberlain: 155
  3. 1946-47 Bob Feerick: 144
  4. 2014-15 DeAndre Jordan: 143
  5. 1971-72 Wilt Chamberlain: 143
  6. 2019-20 Mitchell Robinson: 141
  7. 1949-50 Alex Groza: 141
  8. 2015-16 DeAndre Jordan: 140
  9. 2011-12 Tyson Chandler: 139
  10. 2016-17 DeAndre Jordan: 139

Bottom 10 Seasons (among qualifiers)

  1. 1960-61 Woody Sauldsberry: 72
  2. 1948-49 John Mahnken: 79
  3. 1964-65 McCoy McLemore: 79
  4. 1959-60 Slick Leonard: 79
  5. 1971-72 Larry Cannon: 80 (ABA)
  6. 1967-68 Joe Hamood: 80 (ABA)
  7. 1959-60 Johnny McCarthy: 80
  8. 1961-62 Woody Sauldsberry: 80
  9. 1955-56 Dick Ricketts: 81
  10. 1959-60 Woody Sauldsberry: 81

Top 10 Careers (among qualifiers)

  1. DeAndre Jordan: 132
  2. Wilt Chamberlain: 125
  3. Rudy Gobert: 124
  4. Artis Gilmore: 121 (including ABA seasons)
  5. Tyson Chandler: 121
  6. Shaquille O'Neal: 120
  7. Darryl Dawkins: 118
  8. Bo Outlaw: 118
  9. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: 118
  10. Mark West: 118

Bottom 10 Careers (among qualifiers)

  1. Woody Sauldsberry: 85
  2. Len Elmore: 85
  3. Ricky Rubio: 85
  4. Wayne Hightower: 86
  5. Wendell Ladner: 86
  6. Brevin Knight: 86
  7. Bird Averitt: 87 (including ABA seasons)
  8. Guy Rodgers: 88
  9. Howard Komives: 88
  10. Bob Wilkerson: 88

FT+: Free throws are one thing that theoretically should be a stable measuring stick across eras. It's the same shot, you're not guarded, etc. I think that's mostly valid, though in the earlier years of the league equipment (balls and rims included) was not as likely to be standardized or reliable. Nonetheless, I would think most improvement in FT shooting is more related to advance in skill than anything else.

Top 10 Seasons (among qualifiers)

  1. 2008-09 Jose Calderon: 127
  2. 1999-00 Jeff Hornacek: 127
  3. 1946-47 Fred Scolari: 127
  4. 1994-95 Spud Webb: 127
  5. 1998-99 Reggie Miller: 126
  6. 1992-93 Mark Price: 126
  7. 1960-61 Bill Sharman: 126
  8. 1995-96 Mahmoud Abdul-Rauf: 126
  9. 1978-79 Rick Barry: 126
  10. 1976-77 Ernie DiGregorio: 126

Bottom 10 Seasons (among qualifiers)

  1. 2014-15 Ian Mahinmi: 41
  2. 1989-90 Chris Dudley: 42
  3. 2000-01 Ben Wallace: 45
  4. 2015-16 Andre Drummond: 47
  5. 2010-11 Brendan Haywood: 47
  6. 1988-89 Chris Dudley: 47
  7. 1989-90 Jerome Lane: 48
  8. 1998-99 Ben Wallace: 49
  9. 2012-13 Andre Drummond: 49
  10. 2009-10 DeAndre Jordan: 49

Top 10 Careers (among qualifiers)

  1. Bill Sharman: 120
  2. Steve Nash: 120
  3. Mark Price: 120
  4. Stephen Curry: 119
  5. Rick Barry: 119 (including ABA seasons)
  6. Peja Stojakovic: 119
  7. Ray Allen: 119
  8. Chauncey Billups: 119
  9. Reggie Miller: 118
  10. Terrell Brandon: 118

Bottom 10 Careers (among qualifiers)

  1. Ben Wallace: 55
  2. Andre Drummond: 60
  3. Chris Dudley: 61
  4. DeAndre Jordan: 62
  5. Wilt Chamberlain: 70
  6. Bo Outlaw: 70
  7. Reggie Evans: 70
  8. Larry Smith: 70
  9. Shaquille O'Neal: 71
  10. Olden Polynice: 71

TS+: True Shooting Percentage puts all the other shooting components together, meaning these are the most efficient shooting seasons (relative to the rest of the league) all time. No one has yet matched Bob Feerick's performance in the BAA's inaugural season when he was 2nd in scoring, 1st in FG% and 4th in FT%.

Top 10 Seasons (among qualifiers)

  1. 1946-47 Bob Feerick: 139
  2. 1972-73 Wilt Chamberlain: 138
  3. 1976-77 Dave Twardzik: 135
  4. 1947-48 Buddy Jeannette: 135
  5. 1948-49 Jake Pelkington: 135
  6. 2011-12 Tyson Chandler: 134
  7. 1949-50 Alex Groza: 134
  8. 1946-47 Ed Sadowski: 132
  9. 1980-81 Artis Gilmore: 131
  10. 1948-49 Arnie Johnson: 131

Bottom 10 Seasons (among qualifiers)

  1. 1946-47 Moe Becker: 66
  2. 1960-61 Woody Sauldsberry: 68
  3. 1960-61 Jim Loscutoff: 70
  4. 1970-71 Lonnie Wright: 71 (ABA)
  5. 1946-47 Bob Dille: 74
  6. 1959-60 Woody Sauldsberry: 75
  7. 1946-47 Grady Lewis: 76
  8. 1961-62 Woody Sauldsberry: 76
  9. 1948-49 John Mahnken: 76
  10. 1948-49 Ralph Hamilton: 76

Top 10 Careers (among qualifiers)

  1. Neil Johnston: 119
  2. Dave Twardzik: 119
  3. Kenny Sears: 119
  4. Artis Gilmore: 118
  5. Ed Macauley: 118
  6. Cedric Maxwell: 118
  7. DeAndre Jordan: 117
  8. Tyson Chandler: 117
  9. Adrian Dantley: 116
  10. Reggie Miller: 116

Bottom 10 Careers (among qualifiers)

  1. Woody Sauldsberry: 79
  2. Wendell Ladner: 82 (ABA)
  3. Jack McMahon: 86
  4. Len Elmore: 86 (including ABA seasons)
  5. Gerald Govan: 87 (ABA)
  6. Joe Ellis: 87
  7. Gar Heard: 88
  8. Guy Rodgers: 88
  9. Bob Wilkerson: 88
  10. Slick Leonard: 88

FTr+: The outliers here are nearly all of recent vintage.

Top 10 Seasons (among qualifiers)

  1. 2015-16 DeAndre Jordan: 441
  2. 2002-03 Reggie Evans: 364
  3. 2004-05 Danny Fortson: 352
  4. 2014-15 Bismack Biyombo: 344
  5. 2010-11 Omer Asik: 343
  6. 2013-14 Tyler Hansbrough: 332
  7. 2012-13 Dwight Howard: 328
  8. 2009-10 Dwight Howard: 326
  9. 2014-15 DeAndre Jordan: 323
  10. 2008-09 Reggie Evans: 322

Top 10 Careers (among qualifiers)

  1. Reggie Evans: 283
  2. Rudy Gobert: 275
  3. Dwight Howard: 270
  4. DeAndre Jordan: 251
  5. Donald Royal: 244
  6. Cedric Maxwell: 226
  7. Bismack Biyombo: 221
  8. Arnie Johnson: 221
  9. Tyler Hansbrough: 219
  10. Chris Andersen: 218

3PAr+: No surprises that these outliers are almost all from the early days of the 3-point shot.

Top 10 Seasons (among qualifiers)

  1. 1981-82 Joe Hassett: 2164
  2. 1980-81 Joe Hassett: 2006
  3. 1982-83 Mike Dunleavy: 1514
  4. 1980-81 Henry Bibby: 1357
  5. 1979-80 Joe Hassett: 1271
  6. 1984-85 Don Buse: 1217
  7. 1981-82 Don Buse: 1066
  8. 1985-86 Dale Ellis: 978
  9. 1981-82 Mike Bratz: 944
  10. 1979-80 Rick Barry: 937

Top 10 Careers (among qualifiers)

  1. Don Buse: 664 (including ABA seasons)
  2. Chico Vaughn: 662 (ABA)
  3. Bill Keller: 561 (ABA)
  4. Craig Hodges: 548
  5. George Lehmann: 545 (ABA)
  6. Michael Adams: 462
  7. Michael Cooper: 431
  8. Trent Tucker: 411
  9. Glen Combs: 402 (ABA)
  10. Matt Bullard: 387

FG Points Added: The lists above were all limited to qualifiers to keep out players with too few shots, but they're also dominated by lots of relatively low-volume players. To combine volume with efficiency (or lack thereof) we've calculated how many points a player gained (or lost) vs what a league average player would have done with their attempts. Looking strictly at field goals, Wilt Chamberlain and Kareem Abdul-Jabbar tower over every other player in league history. The only non-big man to post a top-30 season is Stephen Curry.

Top 30 Seasons

  1. 1966-67 Wilt Chamberlain: 555.7
  2. 1961-62 Wilt Chamberlain: 502.3
  3. 1962-63 Wilt Chamberlain: 485.2
  4. 1971-72 Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: 482.0
  5. 1970-71 Kareem Adbul-Jabbar: 469.7
  6. 1960-61 Wilt Chamberlain: 464.2
  7. 1965-66 Wilt Chamberlain: 425.9
  8. 1963-64 Wilt Chamberlain: 419.5
  9. 1967-68 Wilt Chamberlain: 409.5
  10. 2015-16 Stephen Curry: 406.1
  11. 1993-94 Shaquille O'Neal: 362.0
  12. 1964-65 Wilt Chamberlain: 352.8
  13. 1976-77 Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: 349.7
  14. 1961-62 Walt Bellamy: 348.3
  15. 1971-72 Artis Gilmore: 347.8 (ABA)
  16. 1972-73 Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: 346.7
  17. 1979-80 Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: 326.3
  18. 1999-00 Shaquille O'Neal: 319.7
  19. 1972-73 Wilt Chamberlain: 317.1
  20. 1968-69 Wilt Chamberlain: 312.9
  21. 1986-87 Kevin McHale: 303.6
  22. 1949-50 Alex Groza: 301.4
  23. 1971-72 Wilt Chamberlain: 297.2
  24. 1980-81 Artis Gilmore: 296.5
  25. 1987-88 Charles Barkley: 294.3
  26. 2013-14 LeBron James: 294.1
  27. 1973-74 Bob McAdoo: 290.2
  28. 2012-13 LeBron James: 288.7
  29. 1973-74 Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: 281.4
  30. 1989-90 Charles Barkley & 2000-01 Shaquille O'Neal: 281.2

Bottom 10 Seasons

  1. 1991-92 Mark Macon: -195.7
  2. 2009-10 Rodney Stuckey: -194.6
  3. 1982-83 Ray Williams: -190.3
  4. 1975-76 Rich Jones: -190.3
  5. 2015-16 Kobe Bryant: -189.5
  6. 1975-76 Bob Love: -189.5
  7. 2008-09 Russell Westbrook: -187.5
  8. 1965-66 Guy Rodgers: -187.5
  9. 2001-02 Allen Iverson: -184.7
  10. 1975-76 Norm Van Lier: -183.0

Top 30 Careers

  1. Wilt Chamberlain: 5063.0
  2. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: 4893.8
  3. Shaquille O'Neal: 3789.2
  4. Artis Gilmore: 3309.5 (including ABA seasons)
  5. Walt Bellamy: 2313.5
  6. Charles Barkley: 2131.4
  7. LeBron James: 2077.1
  8. Reggie Miller: 2073.0
  9. Dwight Howard: 1990.5
  10. Stephen Curry: 1801.8
  11. Oscar Robertson: 1797.3
  12. Steve Nash: 1782.8
  13. Robert Parish: 1734.6
  14. Ray Allen: 1698.7
  15. Karl Malone: 1675.2
  16. John Stockton: 1633.7
  17. DeAndre Jordan: 1625.4
  18. Adrian Dantley: 1607.2
  19. Kevin McHale: 1598.7
  20. Otis Thorpe: 1435.3
  21. Bob Lanier: 1420.9
  22. Dale Ellis: 1411.2
  23. Kyle Korver: 1384.6
  24. Chris Mullin: 1369.6
  25. Buck Williams: 1352.6
  26. Larry Nance: 1311.7
  27. Julius Erving: 1296.9 (including ABA seasons)
  28. Jerry West: 1277.2
  29. Jerry Lucas: 1276.8
  30. Kevin Durant: 1239.0

Bottom 10 Careers

  1. Russell Westbrook: -1304.5
  2. Allen Iverson: -1222.1
  3. Guy Rodgers: -1121.3
  4. Dennis Johnson: -1034.1
  5. Jerry Stackhouse: -968.6
  6. DeMar DeRozan: -947.3
  7. Larry Hughes: -884.5
  8. Kendall Gill: -860.5
  9. Howard Komives: -845.6
  10. Isiah Thomas: -816.4

TS Points Added: When you add free throws to the mix, Wilt falls from 1st to 3rd. Kareem is the all-time single-season and career leader in this metric. The leaderboard has a nice mix of bigs and guards, with Reggie Miller, Oscar Robertson and Jerry West all in the top 10 all-time.

Top 30 Seasons

  1. 1971-72 Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: 460.4
  2. 2015-16 Stephen Curry: 454.7
  3. 1970-71 Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: 453.0
  4. 1966-67 Wilt Chamberlain: 441.5
  5. 1987-88 Charles Barkley: 433.5
  6. 1961-62 Wilt Chamberlain: 430.3
  7. 1983-84 Adrian Dantley: 404.8
  8. 2012-13 Kevin Durant: 394.9
  9. 1963-64 Oscar Robertson: 392.5
  10. 2013-14 Kevin Durant: 383.9
  11. 1949-50 Alex Groza: 377.4
  12. 1962-63 Wilt Chamberlain: 374.9
  13. 1989-90 Charles Barkley: 374.5
  14. 1964-65 Jerry West: 374.3
  15. 1965-66 Jerry West: 373.3
  16. 1966-67 Oscar Robertson: 369.7
  17. 1962-63 Oscar Robertson: 366.2
  18. 1948-49 George Mikan: 365.5
  19. 1989-90 Karl Malone: 362.8
  20. 1988-89 Charles Barkley: 362.0
  21. 1981-82 Adrian Dantley: 361.2
  22. 1986-87 Kevin McHale: 359.6
  23. 1967-68 Connie Hawkins: 359.4 (ABA)
  24. 1981-82 Artis Gilmore: 353.9
  25. 2007-08 Amar'e Stoudemire: 352.0
  26. 2013-14 LeBron James: 347.0
  27. 1980-81 Artis Gilmore: 346.6
  28. 1973-74 Bob McAdoo: 346.5
  29. 1976-77 Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: 345.3
  30. 1980-81 Adrian Dantley: 344.1

Bottom 10 Seasons

  1. 1960-61 Woody Sauldsberry: -246.3
  2. 1971-72 Wendell Ladner: -244.2 (ABA)
  3. 1959-60 Woody Sauldsberry: -239.7
  4. 1965-66 Guy Rodgers: -235.0
  5. 1991-92 Mark Macon: -226.3
  6. 1958-59 Woody Sauldsberry: -221.5
  7. 1975-76 Len Elmore: -216.2 (ABA)
  8. 1975-76 Rich Jones: -215.8 (ABA)
  9. 2013-14 Josh Smith: -213.1
  10. 1995-96 Jason Kidd (-211.4)

Top 30 Careers

  1. Kareem Abdul-Jabbar: 4718.8
  2. Artis Gilmore: 3880.0 (including ABA seasons)
  3. Wilt Chamberlain: 3587.0
  4. Oscar Robertson: 3519.5
  5. Reggie Miller: 3449.8
  6. Adrian Dantley: 3109.7
  7. Charles Barkley: 2972.9
  8. Karl Malone: 2913.8
  9. Shaquille O'Neal: 2759.1
  10. Jerry West: 2686.5
  11. LeBron James 2643.2
  12. Kevin Durant: 2607.7
  13. John Stockton: 2465.6
  14. Walt Bellamy: 2362.0
  15. Dirk Nowitzki: 2350.8
  16. James Harden: 2146.4
  17. Ray Allen: 2130.1
  18. Steve Nash: 2127.5
  19. Magic Johnson: 2098.5
  20. Stephen Curry: 2080.8
  21. Michael Jordan: 1943.8
  22. Kevin McHale: 1920.4
  23. Bailey Howell: 1891.6
  24. Moses Malone: 1888.8 (including ABA seasons)
  25. David Robinson: 1860.8
  26. Dwight Howard: 1846.7
  27. Chris Mullin: 1797.6
  28. Paul Pierce: 1771.8
  29. Bob Pettit: 1757.9
  30. Dan Issel: 1737.5 (including ABA seasons)

Bottom 10 Careers

  1. Guy Rodgers: -1397.1
  2. Woody Sauldsberry: -1326.5
  3. Antoine Walker: -1306.7
  4. Stew Johnson: -1199.6 (ABA)
  5. Elvin Hayes: -1138.4
  6. Mookie Blaylock: -1061.3
  7. Raymond Felton: -961.6
  8. Kendall Gill: -957.3
  9. Gar Heard: -948.4
  10. Fred Carter: -918.0

We hope you enjoy this addition to the site. Please let us know if you have any questions or comments.

 

5 Responses to “Adjusted Shooting Stats Added to Basketball Reference”

  1. Kirk Says:

    Was doing a player comp, and noticed different league shooting % for West and Robertson, even though they played in the exact same seasons. Both are from 1961-1974; the league FG% for West shows 0.440, but only 0.439 for Robertson. Is this just a rounding error? If so, shouldn't the rounding error be in the same direction for both? This type of difference could lead to a disproportionate gap between their FG+.

    http://bkref.com/tiny/X4FMX

  2. Mike Lynch Says:

    Hi Kirk,

    The slight differences are because the league percentages for the player's career are weighted for player attempts in each of the seasons.

  3. Rich Says:

    Fantastic work Mike!! This is the scoring data I've been publishing as "Points Above Average". Here is the "300 Points Club": http://www.nbametrics.com/p/true-points-above-pointsgame-player.html

    Glad to see you combined the NBA & ABA. This shows how great a scorer Artis Gilmore was.

    Thanks for doing more of the heavy lifting!

  4. Mike Lynch Says:

    love the per game angle. great stuff!

  5. Rich Says:

    Thanks Mike. Short career guys like Neil Johnston, Mikan & Arizin get their due when we look at per game efficiency: https://www.nbametrics.com/p/top-scoring-seasons-in-nba-history.html

    I appreciate you checking out my site.

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