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Figure Skating at the 2010 Vancouver Winter Games:

Women's Singles

Figure Skating at the 2010 Winter Games: Previous Winter Games ▪ Next Winter Games

Events:
Phases:

Host City: Vancouver, Canada
Venue(s): Pacific Coliseum, Vancouver
Date Started: February 23, 2010
Date Finished: February 25, 2010
Format: Total of points from short program and free skating.

Gold: KOR Yu-Na Kim
Silver: JPN Mao Asada
Bronze: CAN Joannie Rochette

Summary

There was no heavier favorite in 2010 Olympic figure skating than the Korean [Kim Yu-Na]. Kim was the defending World Champion, and had only lost twice since 2007, placing third at the 2008 Worlds and second in the 2009 Grand Prix Final. In 2008-09, she won the World Championships, Skate America, and the Four Continents, while in the 2009-10 season she had already won Skate America and the Grand Prix Final coming into Vancouver. In the short program, she opened well, taking a comfortable lead over Japan's Mao Asada. Two nights later, in the free skate, her performance was the stuff of legend, as she scored 150.06 for a total of 228.56, both world best marks for women in the new scoring system – the previous bests were 133.95 and 210.03 by Kim at the 2009 French Grand Prix. This gave her a huge victory over Asada, who held on for the silver medal, leading her by 23.06 points. Kim was coached by Brian Orser, the 1988 men's silver medalist.

The bronze medal was won by Canadian Joannie Rochette, but on this day, it shone as brilliantly in the Vancouver sun as any gold medal. Rochette had been runner-up to Kim at the 2009 World Championships and was a six-time Canadian champion, having twice won the Trophée Éric Bombard. A native of a small-town in Québec, on Saturday, only days before the short program, her mother and father flew to Vancouver to watch their daughter compete in the Olympics. On arrival at the airport, Thérèse Rochette developed chest pains and was rushed to a Vancouver hospital where she died soon thereafter from the effects of a massive heart attack. Joannie was scheduled to compete in the short program on Tuesday but it was not certain if she would compete. She elected to skate, honoring her mother, and she placed third in the short with a solid program with no significant flaws. On the night of the free skate, her father, Normand Rochette, watched from the stands as his daughter skated beautifully. She had one small stumble coming out of a combination jump, but she held up both physically and emotionally, to mount the podium in her mother's memory, the first time a Canadian had won an Olympic medal in the ladies' singles since Elizabeth Manley in Calgary in 1988. All Canada cheered for her.

Final Standings

Rank Athlete Age Team NOC Medal PTS
1 Yu-Na Kim 19 South Korea KOR Gold 228.56
2 Mao Asada 19 Japan JPN Silver 205.50
3 Joannie Rochette 24 Canada CAN Bronze 202.64
4 Mirai Nagasu 16 United States USA 190.15
5 Miki Ando 22 Japan JPN 188.86
6 Laura Lepistö 21 Finland FIN 187.97
7 Rachael Flatt 17 United States USA 182.49
8 Akiko Suzuki 24 Japan JPN 181.44
9 Alyona Leonova 19 Russia RUS 172.46
10 Kseniya Makarova 17 Russia RUS 171.91
11 Kiira Korpi 21 Finland FIN 161.57
12 Cynthia Phaneuf 22 Canada CAN 156.62
13 Gwak Min-Jeong 16 South Korea KOR 155.53
14 Elene Gedevanishvili 20 Georgia GEO 155.24
15 Sarah Meier 25 Switzerland SUI 152.81
16 Carolina Kostner 23 Italy ITA 151.90
17 Júlia Sebestyén 28 Hungary HUN 151.26
18 Sarah Hecken 16 Germany GER 143.94
19 Liu Yan 25 China CHN 143.47
20 Cheltzie Lee 16 Australia AUS 138.16
21 Jelena Glebova 20 Estonia EST 134.19
22 Sonia Lafuente 18 Spain ESP 133.51
23 Anastasiya Gimazetdinova 29 Uzbekistan UZB 131.65
24 Tuğba Karademir 24 Turkey TUR 129.54
25 r1/2 Isabelle Pieman 26 Belgium BEL 46.10
26 r1/2 Miriam Ziegler 15 Austria AUT 43.84
27 r1/2 Teodora Poštič 25 Slovenia SLO 43.80
28 r1/2 Ivana Reitmayerová 17 Slovakia SVK 41.94
29 r1/2 Jenna McCorkell 23 Great Britain GBR 40.64
30 r1/2 Anna Jurkiewicz 26 Poland POL 36.10