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Ski Jumping at the 1968 Grenoble Winter Games:

Men's Large Hill, Individual

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Host City: Grenoble, France
Venue(s): , Saint-Nizier-du-Moucherotte
Date Started: February 18, 1968
Date Finished: February 18, 1968
Format: Two jumps, with both scored on distance and form.

Gold: URS Vladimir Belousov
Silver: TCH Jiří Raška
Bronze: NOR Lars Grini

Summary

The Olympic Champion from the Normal Hill, Jiří Raška, was highly favored in the Large Hill event after producing excellent training jumps in the days before the competition. But the event produced a surprise winner, the 21-year old Vladimir Belousov from Leningrad fought a close duel with Raška and had the best and longest jumps in both rounds, 101.5 and 98.5 m. Belousov became the first Soviet ski jumper to win an Olympic gold medal. The silver medalist from the 1966 Large Hill World Championships in Holmenkollen, the Japanese Takashi Fujisawa, was second after the first round, but could not control his nerves and missed totally on his second jump, ending in 18th place. Raška made two good jumps and ended in the silver medal position, only 1.9 points behind Belousov. Those two were in the class of their own. The bronze medalist, Norwegian Lars Grini was 17 points behind the winner.

Belousov ended his successful Olympic season with a victory in Holmenkollen one month later. In 1969 he won his only Soviet Championship, and in 1970 he had another Holmenkollen victory after placing sixth at the World Championships on the Normal Hill in Vysoke Tatra.

Final Standings

Rank Athlete Age Team NOC Medal PTS
1 Vladimir Belousov 21 Soviet Union URS Gold 231.3
2 Jiří Raška 27 Czechoslovakia TCH Silver 229.4
3 Lars Grini 23 Norway NOR Bronze 214.3
4 Manfred Queck 26 East Germany GDR 212.8
5 Bent Tomtum 18 Norway NOR 212.2
6 Reinhold Bachler 23 Austria AUT 210.7
7 Wolfgang Stöhr 21 East Germany GDR 205.9
8 Anatoly Zheglanov 21 Soviet Union URS 205.7
9 Ludvik Zajc 25 Yugoslavia YUG 203.8
10 Gilbert Poirot 23 France FRA 203.7
11 Gary Napalkov 19 Soviet Union URS 203.1
12 Rudolf Höhnl 21 Czechoslovakia TCH 202.8
13 Jan Olaf Roaldset 21 Norway NOR 202.6
14 Józef Przybyła 23 Poland POL 199.2
15 Dieter Neuendorf 27 East Germany GDR 198.8
16 Giacomo Aimoni 28 Italy ITA 195.3
17 Alain Macle 23 France FRA 194.0
18 Takashi Fujisawa 24 Japan JPN 192.7
19 László Gellér 23 Hungary HUN 191.3
20T Akitsugu Konno 23 Japan JPN 191.1
20T Yukio Kasaya 24 Japan JPN 191.1
22 Max Golser 27 Austria AUT 190.4
23 Bjørn Wirkola 24 Norway NOR 189.3
24 Veikko Kankkonen 28 Finland FIN 188.9
25 Zbyněk Hubač 27 Czechoslovakia TCH 188.6
26 Seiji Aochi 25 Japan JPN 185.0
27 František Rydval 21 Czechoslovakia TCH 184.8
28 Sepp Lichtenegger 30 Austria AUT 184.6
29 Günther Göllner 26 West Germany FRG 183.5
30 Erwin Fiedor 24 Poland POL 179.7
31 Ryszard Witke 28 Poland POL 179.4
32 Tord Karlsson 26 Sweden SWE 179.2
33 Henrik Ohlmeyer 21 West Germany FRG 177.9
34 Bill Bakke 21 United States USA 175.5
35 Jay Rand 17 United States USA 174.7
36 Franz Keller 23 West Germany FRG 174.1
37 Kurt Elimä 28 Sweden SWE 174.0
38 Peter Štefančič 20 Yugoslavia YUG 173.4
39 Marjan Pečar 27 Yugoslavia YUG 172.8
40 Seppo Reijonen 23 Finland FIN 170.1
41 Vladimir Smirnov 20 Soviet Union URS 169.9
42 John Balfanz 27 United States USA 169.8
43 Jay Martin 23 United States USA 163.8
44 Peter Eržen 26 Yugoslavia YUG 161.7
45 Józef Kocyan 21 Poland POL 159.0
46 Heini Ihle 26 West Germany FRG 156.4
47 Josef Zehnder 23 Switzerland SUI 153.2
48 Baldur Preiml 28 Austria AUT 152.3
49 Topi Mattila 21 Finland FIN 150.5
50T Maurice Arbez 23 France FRA 149.2
50T Juhani Ruotsalainen 19 Finland FIN 149.2
52 Mats Östman 21 Sweden SWE 148.8
53 Kjell Sjöberg 30 Sweden SWE 145.2
54 Michel Saint Lezer 21 France FRA 142.9
55 Ulf Kvendbo 19 Canada CAN 138.7
56 Mihály Gellér 20 Hungary HUN 137.8
57 John McInnes 28 Canada CAN 120.3
58 Claude Trahan 28 Canada CAN 91.0