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Athletics at the 1976 Montréal Summer Games:

Men's Decathlon

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Events:
Phases:

Host City: Montréal, Canada
Venue(s): Olympic Stadium, Olympic Park, Montréal, Québec
Date Started: July 29, 1976
Date Finished: July 30, 1976
Format: Scoring by 1962/1971 point tables.

Gold: USA Bruce Jenner
Silver: FRG Guido Kratschmer
Bronze: URS Mykola Avilov

Summary

In 1972 Bruce Jenner finished 10th in the Olympic decathlon. He then dedicated himself to become the greatest decathlete in the world. In 1974 and 1975 he competed frequently for a decathlete, winning nine of 10 decathlons (he did not finish the 1975 AAU), and being ranked #1 in the world for both years. At the 1976 Olympic Trials, he set his second world record in the event. His biggest competition at Montréal was considered to be the defending champion, Mykola Avilov. Also highly considered were two Poles, Ryszard Skowronek and Ryszard Katus, and the Frenchman, Yves Le Roy. West German Guido Kratschmer led after the first day, with Avilov second and Jenner third. But Jenner was probably the strongest second-day decathlete ever and he was so close that the gold medal would be his if he had a typical day two. And he won the gold medal comfortably. Once he cleared a height in the pole vault, first place was decided, and the only suspense remained the world record. Jenner ran 4:12.61 in the 1,500 to break the world record with 8,618 points (later changed to 8,617 when the tables were changed slightly in 1977). Kratschmer finished second and Avilov won the bronze medal. Jenner used his decathlon victory to become a wealthy man, appearing on television and in movies and with numerous commercial endorsements.

Final Standings

Rank Athlete Age Team NOC Medal P(1971AT) P(1977AT) P(1985AT)
1 Bruce Jenner 26 United States USA Gold 8.618 8.617 8.634 WR
2 Guido Kratschmer 23 West Germany FRG Silver 8.411 8.411 8.407
3 Mykola Avilov 27 Soviet Union URS Bronze 8.369 8.371 8.378
4 Raimo Pihl 26 Sweden SWE 8.218 8.220 8.217
5 Ryszard Skowronek 27 Poland POL 8.113 8.113 8.099
6 Siegfried Stark 21 East Germany GDR 8.048 8.045 8.051
7 Leonid Lytvynenko 27 Soviet Union URS 8.025 8.022 7.963
8 Lennart Hedmark 32 Sweden SWE 7.974 7.974 8.002
9 Aleksandr Grebenyuk 25 Soviet Union URS 7.803 7.802 7.759
10 Claus Marek 22 West Germany FRG 7.767 7.766 7.683
11 Johannes Lahti 24 Finland FIN 7.711 7.708 7.650
12 Ryszard Katus 29 Poland POL 7.616 7.617 7.568
13 Luděk Pernica 26 Czechoslovakia TCH 7.602 7.603 7.535
14 Philippe Bobin 21 France FRA 7.580 7.581 7.532
15 Fred Samara 26 United States USA 7.504 7.505 7.430
16 Georg Werthner 20 Austria AUT 7.493 7.494 7.443
17 Gilles Gémise-Fareau 22 France FRA 7.486 7.486 7.423
18 Daley Thompson 17 Great Britain GBR 7.434 7.436 7.330
19 Roger Lespagnard 29 Belgium BEL 7.322 7.321 7.221
20 Runald Beckman 25 Sweden SWE 7.319 7.320 7.229
21 Eberhard Stroot 25 West Germany FRG 7.063 7.062 7.202
22 Tito Steiner 24 Argentina ARG 7.052 7.052 6.942
23 Fred Dixon 26 United States USA 6.754 6.754 6.808
AC Sepp Zeilbauer 23 Austria AUT DNF
AC Régis Ghesquière 27 Belgium BEL DNF
AC Elías Sveinsson 24 Iceland ISL DNF
AC Eltjo Schutter 23 Netherlands NED DNF
AC Heikki Leppänen 29 Finland FIN DNF