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Most hockey teams played for in 1 year?

Posted by Adam Wodon on March 10, 2015

We've added a page on Hockey-Reference.com that shows the most teams played for in one season, and the most in one career. This table is available via our frivolities section, which can be accessed via the "more" tab towards the top right of the page underneath the search bar.

This list was inspired by Marc Arcobello's "accomplishment" this season. Arcobello recently became just the third player in NHL history to play for four teams in one season. Arcobello, who is a Yale graduate, got off to a hot start with his fourth team, Arizona, with 5 goals in his first 7 games.

He does have some work to do, however, in getting on the other "most played for" list. Mike Sillinger leads that with 12 different teams played for in his career.

Comments Off | Posted in Announcement, Data, Features, Hockey-Reference.com

Get Hockey Player Stats for any Range of Games

Posted by Adam Wodon on March 9, 2015

Hockey Reference has added a feature popular with some of the other sites in the Sports Reference family.

Now, if you go to a player's Game Logs page, you can click two different rows and get cumulative statistics for that player just within that range.

For example, from any player's page, click the "Game Logs" tab. That will show the player's game-by-game statistics for the given season. Click on one game, then click on another. A window will pop up showing the player's cumulative statistics in that span.

This is handy for all sorts of purposes. Please let us know if you have any questions or additional feedback about this tool.

2 Comments | Posted in Announcement, Features, Hockey-Reference.com, Tips and Tricks

SRS Calculation Details

Posted by Mike Lynch on March 3, 2015

One of the more common subjects for queries we receive at Sports-Reference is our SRS (Simple Rating System) figures. For some background, the first of our sites to add SRS was Pro-Football-Reference, when Doug Drinen added it to the site in 2006 and provided this excellent primer. The important thing to know is that SRS is a rating that takes into account average point differential and strength of schedule. For instance, the 2006-07 Spurs won games by an average of 8.43 points per game and played a schedule with opponents that were 0.08 points worse than average, giving them an SRS of 8.35. This means they were 8.35 points better than an average team. An average team would have an SRS of 0.0. The calculation can be complicated, but the premise is simple and it produces easily interpreted results.

However, there are some variations in the way we calculate SRS across our various sites. We'll break down these differences below.

Pro-Football-Reference.com SRS: PFR's SRS is unique in that a home-field advantage is included as a part of the calculation because of the short schedule compared to the other sports (we don't want a team to look relatively weak at the halfway point because they've only played 3 of their first 8 at home, for instance). This HFA fluctuates yearly based on game results, but it is generally somewhere between 2 and 3 points (2006 being an outlier, as you'll see). Below is a look at the HFA numbers we have used since 2001. If you'd like to calculate these HFAs yourself, just sum up every team's home point differential and then divide by the total number of games played across the league that season. This data can easily be found in the Play Index for each season:

  • 2001: 2.0081
  • 2002: 2.2461
  • 2003: 3.5547
  • 2004: 2.5078
  • 2005: 3.6484
  • 2006: 0.8477
  • 2007: 2.8672
  • 2008: 2.5586
  • 2009: 2.2070
  • 2010: 1.8945
  • 2011: 3.2656
  • 2012: 2.4336
  • 2013: 3.1055
  • 2014: 2.4883

College Football SRS: Our CFB SRS does not contain a home-field advantage element, but it does have some other quirks. Most importantly, we have capped the margin of victory considered for the formula. Due to the number of mismatches seen in college football, the maximum point differential a team can be credited with in a game is 24. We also credit all wins as a minimum of plus-7 margin of victory (so if you win by 1 point, it's treated the same as a 7-point win). The same logic is applied to losses, as well. One other wrinkle for CFB is that all non-major opponents are included as one team for the sake of the ratings.

College Basketball SRS: SRS for college hoops is straight forward (no HFA & no adjusted MOV), but one item to note is that games against non-major opponents are not counted in our calculations.

MLB, NBA & NHL: All of these SRS calculations are straight forward with no adjustments for HFA and no capping of MOV. It should be noted, however, that no special consideration is given for extra-innings, overtimes or shootouts, either.

We'll close with a quick rundown of the various merits and weaknesses of SRS, from Drinen's original 2006 post. These bullet points were created to describe the system used for NFL SRS, but many of the strengths and weaknesses can applied to the other sports, as well:

  • The numbers it spits out are easy to interpret - if Team A's rating is 3 bigger than Team B's, this means that the system thinks Team A is 3 points better than Team B. With most ranking algorithms, the numbers that come out have no real meaning that can be translated into an English sentence. With this system, the units are easy to understand.
  • It is a predictive system rather than a retrodictive system - this is a very important distinction. You can use these ratings to answer the question: which team is stronger? I.e. which team is more likely to win a game tomorrow? Or you can use them to answer the question: which of these teams accomplished more in the past? Some systems answer the first questions more accurately; they are called predictive systems. Others answer the latter question more accurately; they are called retrodictive systems. As it turns out, this is a pretty good predictive system. For the reasons described below, it is not a good retrodictive system.
  • It weights all games equally - every football fan knows that the Colts' week 17 game against Arizona was a meaningless exhibition, but the algorithm gives it the same weight as all the rest of the games.
  • It weights all points equally, and therefore ignores wins and losses - take a look at the Colts season. If you take away 10 points in week 3 and give them back 10 points in week 4, you've just changed their record, but you haven't changed their rating at all. If you take away 10 points in week 3 and give back 20 points in week 4, you have made their record worse but their rating better. Most football fans put a high premium on the few points that move you from a 3-point loss to a 3-point win and almost no weight on the many points that move you from a 20-point win to a 50-point win.
  • It is easily impressed by blowout victories - this system thinks a 50-point win and a 10-point loss is preferable to two 14-point wins. Most fans would disagree with that assessment.
  • It is slightly biased toward offensive-minded teams - because it considers point margins instead of point ratios, it treats a 50-30 win as more impressive than a 17-0 win. Again, this is an assessment that most fans would disagree with.
  • This should go without saying, but - I'll say it anyway. The system does not take into account injuries, weather conditions, yardage gained, the importance of the game, whether it was a Monday Night game or not, whether the quarterback's grandmother was sick, or anything else besides points scored and points allowed.

 

2 Comments | Posted in Announcement, Baseball-Reference.com, Basketball-Reference.com, CBB at Sports Reference, CFB at Sports Reference, Data, FAQ, Features, Hockey-Reference.com, Pro-Football-Reference.com, SRS, Stat Questions, Statgeekery, Uncategorized

Rookie Designation Added

Posted by Adam Wodon on March 3, 2015

We have added a process to our database that correctly determines NHL Rookie status, for the purposes of using the Player Finder tools in the Play Index. For example, see the Player Game Finder, and Player Season Finder.

Now you can use those tools to do a search for true rookies, in addition to the variety of other data points you can search on.

Hockey-Reference continues to make improvements to these tools. We welcome your feedback.

Comments Off | Posted in Announcement, Hockey-Reference.com, Play Index

Sports Reference Welcomes Adam Wodon to Our Staff

Posted by sean on February 9, 2015

Adam Wodon has joined Sports Reference today as a Managing Director for Hockey Reference. Adam will be working out of our Philadelphia office as our staff size has now risen to six. Adam brings a great deal of development experience and hockey knowledge to Sports Reference. Adam is the founder and managing editor of College Hockey News. Adam is an Isles fan through and through and also supports the Mets, Jets, and Nets making him the first diehard National League fan on staff. Adam is also on twitter at (@chn_AdamWodon).

Hans VanSlooten (@CantPitch) who had been working on the hockey site for the last 14 months will be taking over primary day-to-day development of Baseball-Reference.com.

2 Comments | Posted in Announcement, Baseball-Reference.com, Basketball-Reference.com, CBB at Sports Reference, CFB at Sports Reference, Expire30d, Hockey-Reference.com, Olympics at S-R, Pro-Football-Reference.com

Games Started, Quality Starts on Hockey-Reference.com

Posted by Hans Van Slooten on December 9, 2014

We've added four new measures to goalies on Hockey-Reference.com, Games StartedQuality Starts, Quality Start Percentage, Really Bad Starts. These should be available anywhere you see goalie stats on the site currently, including the Play Indexes.

Games Started (GS) should be fairly obvious, this is the number of games that a goalie started (i.e. did not come in for another pulled goalie).

Quality Starts and Quality Start Percentage were developed by Rob Vollman, and are described in his Hockey Abstract. Here is a brief description, but we encourage you to pick up a copy of his book for additional discussion of this statistic (and many others):

Quality Start (QS) is when the goalie achieves at least the mean save percentage (for the season) in a game. For the 2013-2014 season that percentage is 91.5%. So, if Tuukka Rask allows only 2 goals on 28 shots (a 92.9% save percentage), that is considered a Quality Start. There is an additional criteria for low shooting games: if a goalie faces 20 or fewer shots, he only needs to get an 88.5% save percentage. The relationship between save percentage and winning percentage (and hence the definition of Quality Start) is shown here (prior to 2009-2010):

Save % Win %
0.913 or better 0.777
0.900 to 0.912 0.536
0.885 to 0.899 0.503
0.884 or worse 0.246

Quality Start Percentage (QS%) is simply the number of Quality Starts / Games Started. This gives you a sense of how often the goalie has a Quality Start. A good rule of thumb for this stat is that anything less than 50% is bad, anything over 60% is among the league leaders, and the league average for an NHL regular is about 53.4%. Also, according to Vollman: "Based on the average of every goalie with fewer than ten starts in a season, the average for replacement -level goalies is 42.8% but, in fairness, there is some selectino bias involved in this since playing that poorly will generally limit you to ten start in the first place."¹

Really Bad Starts (RBS) is another stat coined by Vollman that is "awarded" whenever a goalie has a save percentage in a game less than 85%. A team only has a 10% chance of winning when the goalie has save percentage that low.

Where to find these new stats

"So," you are asking, "where do I find these new stats?" They are available anywhere goalie stats have been listed on the site. Due to a limitation of our data source, they are only available going back to the 2007-08 season. So, if you go to a goalie page, you'll see the stats listed in the NHL Standard and NHL Playoffs sections.

Additionally, you can see the league-wide stats on the yearly page for a league. For instance, the 2015 stats are available here.

Finally, the stats are available on the Player Season Finder for goalies and the Player Playoff Finder for goalies.

As always, we welcome any feedback.

2 Comments | Posted in Advanced Stats, Announcement, Hockey-Reference.com

Play Index Tools Now with Short Surveys & no Ads

Posted by sean on October 8, 2014

Since we've launched the various Play Index tools on our sites, we've struggled with the best way to monetize what we feel is the deepest and most powerful set of sports data tools anywhere. We know they are useful, our users, the teams, broadcast networks, and newspaper reporters tell us so.

On baseball, we charge an annual fee of $36, but our best guess is that the traffic and audience of the other sites would not be sufficient to make a subscription model worth our while. We have been running traditional banner ads on those pages, but they pay so little and the play index content is niche content (valuable, but niche content) so the traffic will never rise that high on the play index pages. So we have decided to remove all banner advertising and instead run Google consumer surveys on the non-baseball play index pages.

Here's how it works. The first time you run a report each day your results will be obscured and you will be asked to answer a 1-5 question survey. After you answer the survey, your requested report will be shown to you and you won't see another survey for that site on that browser for 24 hours (multi-question surveys are good for 48 hours). These surveys pay us around 5 cents per survey which, while it doesn't sound like much, is about 15 times what we would get from banner ads on those pages. Here is an FAQ if you are wondering how Google uses this information.

Also, if you find these gateway surveys a step too far, consider subscribing to our Ad-Free Access. Starting at $20/year you can surf every Sports Reference page ad and survey free.

If you are wondering what our play index tools are, give them a try. We think you'll enjoy them.
Play Index at Basketball-Reference.com
Play Index at Pro-Football-Reference.com
Play Index at Hockey-Reference.com
Play Index at Sports-Reference.com/cbb
Play Index at Sports-Reference.com/cfb

Comments Off | Posted in Advanced Stats, Announcement, Basketball-Reference.com, CBB at Sports Reference, CFB at Sports Reference, Hockey-Reference.com, Pro-Football-Reference.com

Situational Rate Stats on Hockey-Reference.com

Posted by Hans Van Slooten on September 25, 2014

As part of our plan to continue to add "advanced" stats to the site, we've included new rate stats on the "Additional Stats" pages for players. These new stats are primarily "per 60 minutes" versions of already existing stats, but we also have included a break out of assists to include both 1st and 2nd assists per 60 minutes. The advantage of the "per 60" versions of these stats is that it makes it easier to compare players with wildly varying amounts of ice time.

 

Screen Shot 2014-09-25 at 8.14.59 AM

These stats are available by clicking on the "Additional Stats" link on the player pages:

Screen Shot 2014-06-05 at 3.26.02 PM

As always, we appreciate any feedback or questions.

4 Comments | Posted in Advanced Stats, Announcement, Hockey-Reference.com

More #FancyStats Features Added to Hockey-Reference.com

Posted by Hans Van Slooten on September 3, 2014

It's been a while since we last announced new "advanced stats" features to Hockey-Reference, but with the latest shake ups in the hockey stats world, we felt that this was a good time to begin rolling out new features for the more statistically-minded fans out there. This is by no means the only roll out, as there are numerous features to come, but we feel it is better to roll out features as we complete them rather than waiting until they are all done.

That said, here's what we've added:

1) Additional Possession Stats to the Player Additional Stats Page

Screen Shot 2014-09-03 at 12.21.15 AM

We've added Situational TOIRelative Corsi For %, Relative Fenwick For %, On-Ice Save and Shooting %, and Offensive and Defensive Zone Start %. You can find these on any player page after 2006 by clicking on Additional Stats at the top of their regular stats.

Screen Shot 2014-06-05 at 3.26.02 PM

2) A Play Index Finder for Team Advanced Stats

Until we can add additional stats to all of the league and team pages, we've created a simple Finder that allows you to run queries against the team advanced stats. To find this tool, just go to the top-left menu and click play index, then Team Advanced Stats Finder. This report can be run on any or all teams from 2007-2014.

Screen Shot 2014-09-03 at 12.30.12 AM

3) Finally, as a small addition to the play-by-play stats, we've included Faceoff Wins and Losses.

We hope you enjoy these new features and keep checking back often as we add more #FancyStat features as we approach the new season. As always, we appreciate any questions and feedback.

8 Comments | Posted in Advanced Stats, Announcement, Hockey-Reference.com, Play Index

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