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2015 Stanley Cup Playoffs Section

Posted by Mike Lynch on April 15, 2015

With playoffs season upon, we wanted to point out our 2015 NHL Stanley Cup Playoffs section. While it's mostly a shell right now, it will be a good bookmark for info as the playoffs get going. You can find schedule & results for every game, stats for every skater, goalie & team, as well as leaderboards.

There are also series preview pages to see how opponents match up with each other.

If you're more of a history buff, you can also take a skate down memory lane by checking out past playoff seasons, such as 2014 or 2013. Stats for series are also available, such as the 2013 Stanley Cup Final. Links to all playoff seasons (and a list of champions, runners-up and Conn Smythe winners) are available here.

Other Stanley Cup Playoff resources include our all-time Leaders & Records section, list of frequent champions and our Player Playoff Finder tool. With the Player Playoff Finder, you can run all sorts of custom queries such as leading goal scorers, assists leaders, short-handed goal leaders and many others.

Our Team Game Finder & Player Game Finder also contain options to restrict your searches to playoff games only. You can search for things such as the most recent playoff hat tricks & team records in their playoff openers. It should be noted that our player game logs currently go back to the 1988 Playoffs.

We hope you enjoy these features and please let us know what you'd like to see in the future.

No Comments | Posted in Announcement, Features, History, Hockey-Reference.com, Play Index, Playoffs

Individual NCAA Tournament Records added to CBB Site

Posted by Mike Lynch on April 14, 2015

We've made a neat addition to our College Basketball site that we wanted to share with everyone. If you go to our Leaders & Records section, you'll notice that the right column now contains 2 "records" links. These pages contain all-time individual records for NCAA Tournament games and single NCAA Tournaments.

Now you can see that Austin Carr has 3 of the 5 highest scoring games in NCAA Tournament history. And you can even click on the date of the game to check out the box score.

The other option is to look at records for a single tournament run. Glen Rice holds the all-time record for points in a single tournament with 184 in Michigan's run to the 1989 National Championship.

We've added a note to the top of each page to indicate certain limitations of the scope of these statistics. For instance, although the NCAA Tournament has existed since 1939, assists, blocks and steals have only been officially tracked since the mid-1980s.

We hope you all enjoy this new addition.

2 Comments | Posted in Announcement, Basketball-Reference.com, CBB at Sports Reference, Data, Features, History, Leaders

ABA Box Scores & Splits Added

Posted by Mike Lynch on March 23, 2015

We're excited to announce that we have added nearly every box score in ABA history to basketball-reference.com. The ABA ran from 1967-68 to 1975-76, and we now have the boxes for every season except for 1967-68 thanks to the efforts of Michael Hamel, who researched the box scores and has allowed us to use them.

The boxes are accessible from season pages, team schedule pages and team game logs. These box scores have also allowed us to calculate a limited number of team splits.

Perhaps most significantly, we now have game logs and splits from the ABA days of some of the greatest players in basketball history, like Julius Erving and Rick Barry.

This data has also allowed us to create series stats pages for ABA Playoff series. Like this one, in which Dr. J averaged 37.7 PPG in an ABA Finals series win over David Thompson's Denver Nuggets.

This data has not yet been incorporated into player game finder searches or other play index tools, but that's something we'll be looking into in the future.

We hope everyone enjoys this new addition and thanks again to Michael Hamel for his permission to use this data and for his excellent research.

Comments Off | Posted in Announcement, Basketball-Reference.com, Data, History

Organizational Depth Charts Added Back to 2010

Posted by Mike Lynch on March 17, 2015

We have added historical snapshots of franchises with the creation of organizational pitching and batting depth charts back to 2010. These pages are accessible from the team's page. For instance, if you wanted to see the 2010 Phillies, first go to their team page. From there, to see the pitching depth chart, hover over "Pitching" on the gray bar and then choose "Org. Depth Chart."

Phillies screen shot

 

This will then lead you to a page where you can look at a breakdown of the various pitchers (LH starters, RH relievers, etc) throughout different levels of the organization with their stats and levels played at for that season.

The same thing can be done for batting and these pages are available for all franchises back to 2010.

Please note that the formatting on these pages may appear a bit wonky at times, as these are mainly there as historical artifacts.

Comments Off | Posted in Announcement, Baseball-Reference.com, Data, Features, History

Explore PFR’s Super Bowl Section

Posted by Mike Lynch on January 23, 2015

If you haven't seen the Super Bowl Section of our site yet, you should head over and check it out right now, because we think it's pretty awesome. Here are some of the features you'll find once you get there:

And best of all is the Super Bowl Play Finder tool. It's similar to the Play Index Game Play Finder tool, but limits your searches strictly to Super Bowls and allows you to search through every play of all 48 previous games. Some examples:

Our Player Game Finder and Team Game Finder are also unique tools for Super Bowl research. You can use them to find things like every 100-yard rusher in Super Bowl history, the largest point spreads in Super Bowl history or the highest over/unders. You can also identify trends such as the record of the team leading after one quarter (26-11), at halftime (36-10) and through three quarters of play (39-8).

So go ahead and try the Super Bowl Section right now -- it's free, easy to use, and best of all, with it you'll be able to dominate anyone who challenges you in Super Bowl trivia.

UPDATE: We have also added a Super Bowl filter to our Drive Finder, which allows users to find things such as the longest drives in any Super Bowl since 1998 or the fastest Super Bowl touchdown drives since 1998.

1 Comment | Posted in Announcement, Data, Features, History, Play Index, Playoffs, Pro-Football-Reference.com, Super Bowl, Uncategorized

Browse our Biographical Data

Posted by Mike Lynch on December 22, 2014

The holiday travel season is a time when many of us revisit our roots and return to our hometowns and home states. With that in mind, we thought now would be a good time to remind folks of a data-rich, but perhaps rarely seen portion of our site: Bio Data

This corner of baseball-reference features various totals by place of birth, place of death and place of burial.

For instance, it's probably no surprise that California leads all states with 47,958 home runs (more than 3 times more than any other state). But did you know that the 28 players born in New Mexico have the best cumulative OPS? Or that managers born in Florida are the most games over .500?

You can also compare various statistics across birth countries.

And our most recent addition is the ability to sort by age at time of death. Virgil Trucks, for instance, was the oldest former player to pass in the state of Alabama.

There's a lot of interesting data to play around with in this section. Next time your team hires a manager, perhaps they should look in the United Kingdom and avoid Australia, for instance. And, above all else, never scout for pitching help in North Dakota.

Happy Holidays, from Sports Reference.

Comments Off | Posted in Announcement, Baseball-Reference.com, Data, Features, History

Dive Into Our Stats with the Play Index This Season

Posted by Mike Lynch on August 29, 2014
The Play Index is the name we use to refer to PFR's collection of top-notch research tools. Read below for more information on some of the applications we have made available to you.

Search all plays from 1998 to today to find performances that match your criteria. Answer questions like…

Player Season Finder

Search through player season stats spanning from 1920 to today for single seasons or combined seasons that match your criteria. Answer questions like…

The answers to these questions and many, many more are at your fingertips using the Player Season Finder.

Player Game Finder

Search through player game logs spanning from 1960 to today for games that match your criteria. You can find…

With the Player Game Finder, the possibilities are almost endless.

Player Touchdown Finder

Search through every touchdown scored from 1920 to today for scores that match your criteria. Did you know…

Impress your friends and come up with your own "Did You Know" with a little help from the Player Touchdown Finder.

Team Game Finder

Find team games or seasons matching certain criteria. Did you know…

Player Streak Finder

Find the longest player streaks matching certain criteria. Did you know...

Team Streak Finder

Find the longest team streaks matching certain criteria. Did you know...

Super Bowl Play Finder

Search through every play in Super Bowl History.

Draft Finder

Search through every NFL and AFL draft pick.

Find head-to-head results and also find games matching a particular score.

Comments Off | Posted in Announcement, Features, History, Play Index, Pro-Football-Reference.com, Uncategorized

The Complicated History of RBI

Posted by Mike Lynch on August 6, 2014

If you have spent an extended amount of time on Baseball-Reference, you have likely noticed that some of our RBI totals do not match what you will see on some other sites. A notable example would be none other than George Herman Ruth. We list him with 2,214 career RBI, with a career high of 168 in 1921. Many sources, however, credit him with 2,213 career RBI and a season high of 171 in 1921.

How can there be any dispute over how many runs the most iconic player in the history of baseball drove in?

We're glad you asked.

It might come as a surprise to some, but RBI was not an official statistic until 1920, which was Ruth's first season with the Yankees. And even then, Rule 86, Section 8 was remarkably vague from 1920-30, instructing official scorers only that:

"The summary shall contain: The number of runs batted in by each batsman."

That left plenty of room for interpretation of the scoring rule. In the absence of a strict definition, official scorers across the league were inconsistent in what they considered an RBI. This inconsistency polluted numbers for a decade, despite the fact that the statistic was finally "official."

It wasn't until 1931, when Rule 70, Section 13 made the definition more explicit, that a uniform policy for counting RBI existed:

"Runs Batted In are runs scored on safe hits (including home runs), sacrifice hits, outfield put-outs, infield put-outs, and when the run is forced over by reason of the batsman becoming a base-runner. With less than two outs, if an error is made on a play on which a runner from third would ordinarily score, credit the batsman with a Run Batted In."

While this definition has seen some tweaks over time, for the first time official scorers had a clear definition of what should count as an RBI (though tabulation errors were still an issue in a pre-computerized era).

With RBI not tracked by official scorers, where do the pre-1920 RBI numbers come from? Here is a breakdown of the history of various RBI sources.

These RBI numbers have been used in various encyclopedias over the years and have served as the basis for further research done by SABR members. This research, where 5-7 newspaper accounts are looked at for each game in order to deduce RBI, often proves earlier reconstructions (and official totals) wrong. This leads to the volatile nature of early RBI numbers. A well-detailed account of this process by SABR's Herm Krabbenhoft can be found here, showing how he meticulously worked through Ruth's career RBI totals.

These thoroughly researched corrections eventually make their way to Baseball-Reference via Pete Palmer's data after they have been sufficiently vetted, which is why you will see discrepancies between our numbers and what you see in some other places. We have full confidence that when such alterations are made, that we are putting forward the best possible data generated by countless hours of expert research.

2 Comments | Posted in Announcement, Baseball-Reference.com, Data, History, Uncategorized

Explaining the Honus Wagner Career Hits Discrepancy

Posted by Mike Lynch on July 29, 2014

As Derek Jeter continues his climb up baseball's all-time hits list, we have received several inquiries about Honus Wagner's career hit total. We list 3,420, while MLB lists him with 3,430 career hits. While the similarity of the numbers may imply a simple typo, it turns out that the reasons for the one-digit difference are not simple at all.

For an explanation of the history of this deviation, we spoke with Pete Palmer (the source for many of the statistics appearing on this site). Palmer explained that the 1969 Macmillan Baseball Encyclopedia was the genesis of the difference. At the time, official NL statistics only went back to 1903. The encyclopedia created new statistics for years prior to that and the changes were approved by an MLB committee set up to rule on various statistics for inclusion in the encyclopedia. However, the Elias Sports Bureau, which is the official statistician for Major League Baseball, never accepted the committee ruling, which leads to some differing numbers between what you see on Baseball-Reference and what you see in official MLB records. Elias, instead, has always used data from the old Spalding Guides.

Pete Palmer (and by extension Baseball-Reference) has preferred to use the Macmillan data*, because daily figures exist to back the numbers up, which allows for the statistics to be proofed for greater accuracy. Here is a year-by-year look at the difference between our totals and the Spalding totals. These are all from Wagner's pre-1903 seasons (Baseball-Reference total listed first):

  • 1897: 81, 83
  • 1898: 176, 180
  • 1899: 196, 197
  • 1900: 201, 201
  • 1901: 194, 196
  • 1902: 176, 177

Another discrepancy that some of you may notice soon is that Baseball-Reference has Cap Anson with 3,435 career hits, while MLB has him with 3,011. While many discrepancies exist with that data, the bulk of the difference is the fact that we count Anson's 423 hits in the National Association, which we believe was clearly a major league.

TL;DR version: Our hit total for Honus Wagner is not a typo. We recognize it does not align with the official total, but we believe it is the most accurate number.

For further reading on some of the issues with official totals in baseball statistics, please read this excellent 2011 post by Retrosheet's Dave Smith.

*The Macmillan data excluded a few games that were protested and replayed in the 1890s. These statistics were included in the NL stats of the day (save for the wins and losses) and Palmer has added these statistics back into the Macmillan data to reflect this.

37 Comments | Posted in Announcement, Baseball-Reference.com, Data, History, Leaders, Uncategorized

New Awards Added to Baseball-Reference

Posted by Mike Lynch on July 22, 2014

We have rolled out a couple of new additions to our Awards Page:

The Edgar Martinez Award, recognizing the AL's top DH since 1973 & the Delivery Man of the Year, which recognized MLB's top reliever from 2005-13.

Beginning in 2014, the Delivery Man of the Year will be replaced by a pair of honors named for Mariano Rivera (AL) & Trevor Hoffman (NL).

7 Comments | Posted in Announcement, Awards, Baseball-Reference.com, Data, History

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