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B-R: HoF Candidate – Brian Jordan

Posted by Neil on December 13, 2011

Brian Jordan

Brian O'Neal Jordan

Position: Outfielder
Bats: Right, Throws: Right
Height: 6' 1", Weight: 205 lb.

Born: March 29, 1967 in Baltimore, MD (Age 44)
High School: Milford Mill (Baltimore, MD)
School: University of Richmond
Drafted
by the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1st round (30th pick) of the 1988 amateur draft.
Signed July 7, 1988. (All Transactions)
Debut: April 8, 1992
Teams (by GP): Cardinals/Braves/Dodgers/Rangers 1992-2006

Final Game: September 30, 2006

Year Age Tm Lg G PA AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG OPS OPS+ TB GDP HBP SH SF IBB Pos Awards
1988 21 STL-min A- 19 81 71 12 22 3 1 4 12 3 3 6 15 .310 .388 .549 .937 39 3 1 0 1 HAM · NYPL
1989 22 STL-min A 11 45 43 7 15 4 1 2 11 0 2 0 8 .349 .378 .628 1.006 27 1 2 0 0 0 SPT · FLOR
1990 23 STL-min AA,A+ 25 83 80 7 13 1 1 0 1 0 2 2 22 .163 .193 .200 .393 16 1 0 0 0 ARK,SPT · TL,FLOR
1991 24 STL-min AAA 61 238 212 35 56 11 4 4 24 10 3 17 41 .264 .342 .410 .752 87 5 8 1 0 1 LOU · AA
1992 25 STL-min AAA 43 169 155 23 45 3 1 4 16 13 2 8 21 .290 .337 .400 .737 62 1 4 0 2 1 LOU · AA
1992 25 STL NL 55 204 193 17 40 9 4 5 22 7 2 10 48 .207 .250 .373 .623 77 72 6 1 0 0 1 79/8
1993 26 STL-min AAA 38 165 144 24 54 13 2 5 35 9 4 16 17 .375 .442 .597 1.040 86 3 3 0 2 0 LOU · AA
1993 26 STL NL 67 242 223 33 69 10 6 10 44 6 6 12 35 .309 .351 .543 .894 138 121 6 4 0 3 0 879
1994 27 STL NL 53 197 178 14 46 8 2 5 15 4 3 16 40 .258 .320 .410 .730 91 73 6 1 0 2 0 97/83
1995 28 STL NL 131 525 490 83 145 20 4 22 81 24 9 22 79 .296 .339 .488 .827 116 239 5 11 0 2 4 *98
1996 29 STL NL 140 560 513 82 159 36 1 17 104 22 5 29 84 .310 .349 .483 .833 118 248 6 7 2 9 4 *98/3 MVP-8
1997 30 STL-min AAA 6 22 20 1 3 0 0 0 2 0 1 1 2 .150 .227 .150 .377 3 0 1 0 0 0 LOU · AA
1997 30 STL NL 47 161 145 17 34 5 0 0 10 6 1 10 21 .234 .311 .269 .580 55 39 4 6 0 0 1 98
1998 31 STL NL 150 617 564 100 178 34 7 25 91 17 5 40 66 .316 .368 .534 .902 134 301 18 9 0 4 1 *98/D5
1999 32 ATL NL 153 645 576 100 163 28 4 23 115 13 8 51 81 .283 .346 .465 .811 103 268 9 9 0 9 2 *9 AS,MVP-19
2000 33 ATL NL 133 537 489 71 129 26 0 17 77 10 2 38 80 .264 .320 .421 .742 85 206 12 5 0 5 1 *9
2001 34 ATL NL 148 605 560 82 165 32 3 25 97 3 2 31 88 .295 .334 .496 .830 109 278 18 6 0 8 3 *9/D8 MVP-18
2002 35 LAD NL 128 515 471 65 134 27 3 18 80 2 2 34 86 .285 .338 .469 .807 118 221 10 6 0 4 3 *7/9D
2003 36 LAD NL 66 253 224 28 67 9 0 6 28 1 1 23 30 .299 .372 .420 .791 112 94 3 4 0 2 3 78/9D
2004 37 TEX-min AAA,AA 13 49 45 4 13 3 0 0 8 1 0 3 9 .289 .347 .356 .702 16 0 1 0 0 1 OKC,FRI · PCL,TL
2004 37 TEX AL 61 233 212 27 47 13 1 5 23 2 2 16 35 .222 .275 .363 .638 60 77 7 1 0 4 2 9D/7
2005 38 ATL-min A 5 20 16 5 8 1 0 1 7 1 0 2 2 .500 .500 .750 1.250 12 0 0 0 2 1 ROM · SALL
2005 38 ATL NL 76 251 231 25 57 8 2 3 24 2 0 14 46 .247 .295 .338 .632 65 78 5 3 0 3 0 79
2006 39 ATL-min AAA,A 5 20 16 3 5 1 0 2 4 0 0 4 7 .313 .450 .750 1.200 12 0 0 0 0 0 RMD,ROM · IL,SALL
2006 39 ATL NL 48 101 91 11 21 2 0 3 10 0 0 7 23 .231 .287 .352 .639 63 32 3 1 0 2 0 3/789
15 Seasons 1456 5646 5160 755 1454 267 37 184 821 119 48 353 842 .282 .333 .455 .788 104 2347 118 74 2 57 25
162 Game Avg. 162 628 574 84 162 30 4 20 91 13 5 39 94 .282 .333 .455 .788 104 261 13 8 0 6 3
STL (7 yrs) 643 2506 2306 346 671 122 24 84 367 86 31 139 373 .291 .339 .474 .813 114 1093 51 39 2 20 11
ATL (5 yrs) 558 2139 1947 289 535 96 9 71 323 28 12 141 318 .275 .327 .443 .770 94 862 47 24 0 27 6
LAD (2 yrs) 194 768 695 93 201 36 3 24 108 3 3 57 116 .289 .349 .453 .802 116 315 13 10 0 6 6
TEX (1 yr) 61 233 212 27 47 13 1 5 23 2 2 16 35 .222 .275 .363 .638 60 77 7 1 0 4 2
NL (14 yrs) 1395 5413 4948 728 1407 254 36 179 798 117 46 337 807 .284 .336 .459 .795 106 2270 111 73 2 53 23
AL (1 yr) 61 233 212 27 47 13 1 5 23 2 2 16 35 .222 .275 .363 .638 60 77 7 1 0 4 2
Provided by Baseball-Reference.com: View Original Table
Generated 12/13/2011.

This entry was posted on Tuesday, December 13th, 2011 at 3:45 pm and is filed under Announcement, Baseball-Reference.com, Hall of Fame. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

15 Responses to “B-R: HoF Candidate – Brian Jordan”

  1. I'm not sure I understand the point of these postings.

    It's even odd the way the stat tables are posted, with Minor League stats listed while (if the post titles are to be believed) we are to be considering these player's HOF candidacy.

  2. He was the best post-1992 MLer that came from the NFL (way to squeeze you out, Deion & Bo)

  3. What amazes me about the stats is how darn good he was in the field. I was a big Cards fan, and he never really got a lot of attention for his capabilities in the outfield.

  4. Brian Jordan is similar to Edgardo Alfonzo. They were both good players who at their best were very good, but were not able to maintain their very good status long enough to merit consideration for the Hall.

  5. Joe Garrison Says:

    Lots of talent, not enough complete seasons...

  6. Drew Weaver Says:

    Butch Hobson? Jim Northrup? HoF? Darin Erstad? Darnell Coles? Fernando Vina? Let's discuss them all! Roger Repoz.....Chris Speier....Jim Hickman....Horace Clarke.....Bob Robertson......

  7. @6

    Nobody gets in until Rafael Belliard gets his chance :-O

  8. He belongs in the Met Killer Hall of Fame, but that's about it.

  9. On his way out the door, BR blogger Andy suggested that the BR blog was getting stale.

    Now, we're contemplating the Cooperstown merits of Jeromy Burnitz and Brian Jordan.
    :-|

  10. I think a lot of people forget that he was pretty damn good for a few seasons, and he's certainly an underrated player... But yeah, nowhere near The Hall. Not even close.

  11. Brian Jordan arguably constituted the best defensive right fielder of his generation. As a Braves' fan, I was able to watch him defensively and he proved tremendous and underappreciated for a couple reasons: first, Andruw Jones' defense in center overshadowed Jordan's in right and second, the lack of sophisticated defensive metrics a decade ago caused many statistically-oriented fans to woefully underrate him. Indeed, the fact that he never received a Gold Glove is almost criminal because Jordan proved defensively superior to fellow National League right fielders like Larry Walker and I’m glad to see an advanced metric such as Defensive WAR support my observations from back then. As a former Pro Bowl alternate strong safety in the NFL, Jordan's athletic ability spoke for itself, but he also ran crisp routes and proved efficient. He probably played the most aggressive right field in the league and was willing to constantly take risks, yet he committed very few errors. Jordan charged balls well, threw with both strength and accuracy, and excelled both coming in and going out, on balls in the gap and down the line. And true to his status as a former football player, he gave up his body routinely to dive for balls and crash into walls, probably explaining many of his missed games.

    Offensively, Jordan lacked the plate discipline to post perennially strong on-base percentages and amount to an elite hitter. Still, he was the cleanup hitter for multiple playoff teams and multiple franchises, including the National League champion Braves in 1999. His ability to turn on fastballs and make contact allowed him to hit for solid batting averages, constitute a proverbial “RBI man,” and hit for commendable power, surpassing 20 home runs in four different seasons. He was liable to chase off-speed pitches out of the strike zone, but he crushed hangers and constituted a great competitor and emotional leader who often rose to the occasion late in games and in “clutch” situations. Just examine his statistical splits in some of his better seasons, such as 2001. Indeed, without inking Jordan as a high-priced free agent following the 1998 campaign, Atlanta’s historic streak of division titles probably would have ended at seven rather than reaching fourteen.

    Since Jordan’s prime wasn’t long enough in terms of games played, he isn’t a serious Hall of Fame candidate. However, he enjoyed a surprisingly strong career for a guy who constituted an NFL standout before becoming an MLB regular. Jordan is probably one of the best defensive right fielders in history and he recorded over 90 runs batted in four times, he scored 100 runs twice, he slammed over 20 home runs four times, he stole over 20 bases twice, he sports a career .282 batting average, he never fanned 90 times in a season, and he hit cleanup in at least 78 games for the 1996 Cardinals, the 1999 Braves, and the 2001 Braves, all of whom won their division and at least reached the National League Championship Series. Jordan also placed in the top twenty in NL MVP balloting in all three of those seasons. The steroids-aggrandized era in which he played and the reality that much of his value came via defense caused the public to overlook Jordan. However, he amounted to one of the National League’s best all-around or two-way right fielders from the mid-1990s to the early years of the twenty-first century.

  12. @11 ... re-polished version:

    Brian Jordan arguably constituted the best defensive right fielder of his generation. As a Braves' fan, I was able to watch him defensively and he proved underappreciated for a couple reasons: first, Andruw Jones' defense in center overshadowed Jordan's in right and second, the lack of sophisticated defensive metrics a decade ago caused many statistically-oriented fans to woefully underrate him. Indeed, the fact that he never received a Gold Glove is almost criminal because Jordan proved defensively superior to fellow National League right fielders like Larry Walker and I’m glad to see an advanced metric such as Defensive WAR support my observations from back then. As a former Pro Bowl alternate strong safety in the NFL, Jordan's athletic ability spoke for itself, but he also ran crisp routes and proved efficient. He probably played the most aggressive right field in the league and was willing to constantly take risks, yet he committed very few errors. Jordan charged balls well, threw with both strength and accuracy, and excelled both coming in and going out, on balls in the gap and down the line. And true to his status as a former football player, he gave up his body routinely to dive for balls and crash into walls, probably explaining many of his missed games.

    Offensively, Jordan lacked the plate discipline to post perennially strong on-base percentages and amount to an elite hitter. Still, he was the cleanup hitter for multiple playoff teams and multiple franchises, including the National League champion Braves in 1999. His ability to turn on fastballs and make contact allowed him to hit for solid batting averages, emerge as a proverbial “RBI man,” and slug for commendable power, surpassing 20 home runs in four different seasons. He was liable to chase off-speed pitches out of the strike zone, but he crushed hangers and constituted a great competitor and emotional leader who often rose to the occasion late in games and in “clutch” situations. Just examine his statistical splits in some of his better seasons, such as 2001. Indeed, without inking Jordan as a high-priced free agent following the 1998 campaign, Atlanta’s historic streak of division titles probably would have ended at seven rather than reaching fourteen.

    Since Jordan’s prime wasn’t long enough in terms of games played, he isn’t a serious Hall of Fame candidate. However, he enjoyed a surprisingly strong career for a guy who constituted an NFL standout before becoming an MLB regular. Jordan is probably one of the best defensive right fielders in history and he recorded over 90 runs batted in four times, he scored 100 runs twice, he slammed over 20 home runs four times, he stole over 20 bases twice, he sports a career .282 batting average, he never fanned 90 times in a season, and he hit cleanup in at least 78 games for the 1996 Cardinals, the 1999 Braves, and the 2001 Braves, all of whom won their division and at least reached the National League Championship Series. Jordan also placed in the top twenty in NL MVP balloting in all three of those seasons. The steroids-aggrandized era in which he played and the reality that much of his value came via defense caused the public to overlook Jordan. However, he amounted to one of the National League’s best all-around or two-way right fielders from the mid-1990s to the early years of the twenty-first century.

  13. By WAR measures, Jordan was one of the all-time great defenders, regardless of position, as discussed in my blog post:

    http://highheatstats.blogspot.com/2011/12/brian-jordan-gold-gloves-biggest-snub.html

    The money quote:

    "Though we don't have complete data and can't say for sure how accurate are the data we have, the WAR fielding runs method puts Jordan in truly exclusive company. He ranks 15th all-time in fielding runs. The top 20, in order:
    -- Brooks Robinson, Andruw Jones, Mark Belanger, Ozzie Smith, Roberto Clemente, Carl Yastrzemski, Barry Bonds, Willie Mays, Joe Tinker, Cal Ripken, Buddy Bell, Paul Blair, Ivan Rodriguez, Robin Ventura, Brian Jordan, Jesse Barfield, Clete Boyer, Al Kaline, Jimmy Piersall, Joe Gordon."

  14. @13 ... very intriguing, thanks for posting.

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